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Acquisitions

Nike Bauer $200 Million Acquisition

W. Graeme Roustan, as Chairman and CEO of Roustan Capital, was invited by Nike's executives to enter the Nike Bauer sale process in the Fall of 2007. Mr. Roustan engaged a Wall Street firm who scheduled interviews with private equity firms that wanted to be Mr. Roustan’s partner in the process.

Mr. Roustan had deep relationships in place with Nike and the industry that put him in an advantageous position to acquire Nike Bauer. After meeting with several Managing Partners at several Private Equity firms, he decided to choose Kohlberg and Company based solely upon his meeting with then Co-Managing Partner Christopher Lacovara and would have rejected outright Kohlberg and Company as his partner otherwise.

Roustan Capital leading the group, with Kohlberg and Company as his partner, won the process to acquire Nike Bauer and closed on the transaction in April 2008.

During the Nike Bauer sale process, Mr. Roustan was also having parallel discussions with the Mission Itech owners. Once Mission Itech had been notified that they had not made the next round, conversations began around Mr. Roustan buying Mission Itech whether he was successful in acquiring Nike Bauer or not.

In September 2008, Mr. Roustan as Chairman of Bauer (the "Company") acquired Mission Itech as a bolt on acquisition, which pushed the Company’s overall market share to number one with approximately 50% of the entire hockey equipment global market. In subsequent years, Cascade Lacrosse, Maverik Lacrosse and other smaller acquisitions were made.

To facilitate Kohlberg and Company's exit, the Board decided to file its IPO on the Toronto Stock Exchange on March 10, 2011. At that time, the Company's Board controlled by Kohlberg and Company’s five Directors was increased from seven to nine with the addition of Bob Nicholson, then CEO of Hockey Canada and Bernard "Bernie" McDonell.

In September 2012, the Company engaged an advisor to look into the potential acquisition of Inaria in Toronto and was also involved in a secondary offering where the entire proceeds were going to Kohlberg and Company. This reduced their stake in the Company further toward their eventual and complete exit. Mr. Roustan left the Company’s Board during this time.

After more than eight years from entering the Nike process to sell Bauer, Mr. Roustan – through his Trust – is still heavily invested in the Company.